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Bidding Information
Lot #    15106
Auction End Date    7/18/2006 11:32:00 AM (mm/dd/yyyy)
          
Title Information
Title (English)    Kerati U'phlaite
Title (Hebrew)   
Author    [The R. Moses Samuel Glasner Coppy]
City    Vienna
Publisher    Anton Schmid
Publication Date    1819
          
Collection Information
Independent Item    This listing is an independent item not part of any collection
          
Description Information
Physical
Description
   [2], 200 ff., 295:200 mm., old hands on fly and several ff., usual light age and damp staining, wide margins. A very good copy bound in contemporary half leather boards, rubbed.
          
Paragraph 1    The copy of R. Moses Samuel Glasner (18561924), with his notes, one rather strong, on several ff. R. Glasner, a great-grandson of R. Moshe Sofer, was born in Pressburg. From 1878 until 1923, when he settled in Erez Israel, he was the rabbi of Klausenburg. He was one of the two Orthodox rabbis in Hungary (the other being Moses Aryeh Roth) who joined the Zionist movement and Mizrachi, and at the founding convention of Mizrachi (Pressburg, 1904) he spoke out against the Orthodox Hungarian rabbis for their attacks upon Zionism and the Mizrachi. He propagated the Zionist idea in speeches and writings among Orthodox circles. He also published several halakhic works (Or Bahir, 1908; Halakhah le-Moshe, 1912; Dor Revi'i, 1921) and a work on the aggadah, Shevivei Esh (1903). In Jerusalem, he took part in the educational and cultural activities of Mizrachi and was especially close to Rabbi A. I. Kook.
          
Detailed
Description
   Commentary on several sections of the Yore Deah by R. Jonathan b. Nathan Nata Eibeschutz (1690/951764), talmudist and kabbalist. A child prodigy, studied in Poland, Moravia, and Prague. In his youth, after the death of his father, he studied in Prossnitz under R. Meir Eisenstadt and R. Eliezer ha-Levi Ettinger, his uncle, and in Vienna under R. Samson Wertheimer. He married the daughter of R. Isaac Spira, the av bet din of Bunzlau. After traveling for some time he settled in Prague in 1715, and in time became head of the yeshivah and a famous preacher. After the death of R. David Oppenheim (1736), he was appointed dayyan of Prague. Elected rabbi of Metz in 1741, he subsequently became rabbi of the Three Communities, Altona, Hamburg, and Wandsbek (1750). Both in Metz and in Altona he had many disciples and was considered a great preacher.

His position in the Three Communities, however, was undermined when the dispute broke out concerning his suspected leanings toward Shabbateanism. This controversy accompanied R. Eybeschuetz throughout his life, and the quarrel had repercussions in every community from Holland to Poland. His main opponent was R. Jacob Emden, also a famous talmudist and a potential rival in the candidature to the rabbinate of the Three Communities. The quarrel developed into a great public dispute which divided the rabbis of the day. While most of the German rabbis opposed R. Eybeschuetz, his support came from the rabbis of Poland and Moravia. A fruitless attempt at mediation was made by R. Ezekiel Landau, rabbi of Prague. Most of R. Eybeschuetz' own community was loyal to him and confidently accepted his refutation of the charges made by his opponent, but dissension reached such a pitch that both sides appealed to the authorities in Hamburg and the government of Denmark for a judicial ruling. The king favored R. Eybeschuetz and ordered new elections, which resulted in his reappointment. After his reelection as rabbi of the Three Communities, some rabbis of Frankfort, Amsterdam, and Metz challenged him to appear before them to reply to the suspicions raised against him. R. Eybeschuetz refused, and when the matter was brought before the Council of the Four Lands in 1753, the council issued a ruling in his favor. In 1760 the quarrel broke out once more when some Shabbatean elements were discovered among the students of R. Eybeschuetz' yeshivah. At the same time his younger son, Wolf, presented himself as a Shabbatean prophet, with the result that the yeshivah was closed.

          
Reference
Description
   EJ; L. Jung (ed.), Men of the Spirit (1964), 45966; M. A. Perlmutter, R. Yehonatan Eybeschuetz ve-Yahaso la-Shabbeta'ut (1947); Mifal ha-Bibliografyah ha-Ivrit, Hoveret le-Dugmah (1964), 1324; CD-EPI
        
Associated Images
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Listing Classification
Period
19th Century:    Checked
  
Location
Other:    Austria
  
Subject
Halacha:    Checked
  
Characteristic
Autographed:    Checked
Language:    Hebrew
  
Manuscript Type
  
Kind of Judaica